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FAQ’S

Below are some of the common questions I’ve received while campaigning. Please contact me if you have other questions you would like addressed!

What do you think about SRO’s?

In regards to SRO’s, I can speak to my personal experience (many years ago at my high school) but I don’t think that’s relevant to the current climate and the current situation at our schools in Tigard. While I’ve had good interactions with our SRO’s, I know that’s not always the case with our students and I’ve heard stories directly from students regarding their experiences. The bottom line here is that I’m not the expert. I’m listening to the conversations between all of the interested parties that are going on with TTSD. With that ongoing conversation it’s impossible right now to know what the ending recommendation will be, but I think whatever happens, either we won’t have SRO’s in the schools or the role may end up looking different. I want to support the best possible situation for our students to feel safe while also providing a safe community environment. While I understand it feels like a political non-committal answer, it’s incredibly important to me to listen to our community on this issue and really take into consideration the experiences of those directly impacted by the policy. So in the end I have an open mind with what the best solution is.

Why are you running for city councilor, what do you bring to the table that your opponents do not?

I’m running for city council because the community I live in matters to me. I’m a native Oregonian, a first generation American, grew up in a single parent household, and the first in my family to go to college. My success is a direct result of my community caring and investing in me and I want to serve Tigard with the purpose, care, and thoughtfulness I was shown. 

My husband and I fell in love with Tigard. We’re incredibly excited to be starting a family here and cannot wait to show our little girl everything we love about Tigard. One of the things that I appreciate the most about Tigard is the people. Volunteers give their time on boards, committees and non-profits, the business community supports each other, and the residents give tirelessly of their time and money. Tigard is unique and special because of its people.

I’ve worked hard for Tigard residents since my appointment to Council in 2019. Working alongside community members, organizations, and businesses has allowed me to better understand and address issues facing our community. I bring professional accounting experience to the Council, which includes taking the extra step of a college level course to better understand Government Accounting to advise on issues that come before us. Being in a younger demographic, with a young family also gives me perspective on a variety of issues facing other Tigard families. These are perspectives I bring to the Council and consider in every vote I take.

What do you think about the BLM?

I’ll be clear where I stand – Black Lives Matter. I’m proud to have marched in both the Tigard march and with the TTSD students from Tualatin to Tigard high schools. I understand and acknowledge that our Black community is treated differently and have been a strong supporter of our efforts at the City level to work through discussing policy changes with our Police Department and evaluating City services. Racism exists in Tigard – it was never more clear to me when this discussion evolved and we received a significant amount of feedback from our community members that don’t believe racism exists anymore. I certainly don’t expect to have experienced it myself as a white female, however I’ve heard stories from our community members and I believe them. I appreciate the thoughtful conversations we are having on a City level how we can address these issues with policies and leadership.

What is the #1 problem facing Tigard and what do you propose we do about it?

Tigard has the River Terrace development, potentially adding two urban growth reserve areas: River Terrace West and South, Downtown Urban Renewal District, Tigard Triangle Renewal District, and the Washington Square Regional Center Update Project. These projects show us that Tigard is growing and changing before our eyes. 

The biggest issue we face is how do we plan this change in an equitable way. We can’t deny that change is coming, and it’s our responsibility to make sure we create a community that has housing options, transportation options, and thriving businesses while protecting our climate.

To support multiple housing options, there have been code changes to allow for more housing built within the city limits including Accessory Dwelling Units and Cottage Clusters. Tigard has the Affordable Housing Plan, passed in 2019, and partners with community organizations to provide affordable housing options such as the Senior Center Housing. 

Our Complete Streets Policy views transportation through the lens of all road users. This means new roads should provide alternatives to single vehicle traffic through public transportation, protected bike lanes, and safer sidewalks. 

I’ve pushed to ensure new development has appropriate land for businesses. This includes supporting multi-use housing coming into the Tigard Triangle with retail space below the housing units and having business land in the River Terrace areas. 

Creating these kinds of developments allows for users to have access to alternative transportation, along with incentivizing construction using sustainable materials and renewable energy to help combat climate change.

What is your vision for the Tigard Triangle area?

My vision for the Tigard Triangle is to create an equitable area with options for housing, transportation, thriving businesses, and adequate parks land.
Ideally there should be multiple housing options, including everything from affordable housing options, market rate apartments, missing middle housing including options like duplexes or cottage clusters, and single family homes.
Infrastructure upgrades should be completed using the Complete Streets Policy. This means streets are upgraded with all road users in mind: vehicles, public transportation, cyclists, and pedestrians.
The Tigard Triangle includes some thriving businesses already, but I want to provide additional opportunities for small businesses to be successful. This could tie into existing developments or in underdeveloped areas of the Triangle.
It’s important to create parks and trails in the planning process. We’ve learned it’s more important than ever to have adequate outdoor space and can achieve that with parks and trails planned early.

What is your stance on development plans in the River Terrace area, including the planned Art Rutkin Elementary School? 

We can’t deny that change and development are coming and it’s our responsibility to make sure we create a cohesive community when planned development does happen. River Terrace has already been planned and approved, we have an opportunity for River Terrace West and South during the concept planning phase going on now. I’m supportive of this growth, if during planning we have the appropriate mix of housing to ensure equitable neighborhoods, transportation systems to support the development, address infrastructure needs, and have a mix of types of land to provide amenities in close proximity. We are working hard to ensure that there is robust community engagement including forming a community committee and providing ample opportunity for resident input.
I am supportive of the elementary school that is planned in River Terrace. Our students shouldn’t have to travel all over the city in order to receive their education.

What is your stance on the proposed Southwest Corridor MAX light rail line and the Metro transportation bond this fall that would fund it? 

Light rail has a complicated history with the City of Tigard and our voters. Get Moving 2020, Measure 26-218, has many flaws and is not a perfect measure, however I think the positives for our community outweigh the negatives for the long term benefit.
Tigard has the opportunity to expand the options for transportation. Couple this with the changes in the Tigard Triangle, and there are opportunities for a different style of suburban living, including not being dependent on a personal vehicle and an eye on climate change. The measure also funds a critical study of 99W, changes to 217, and many upgrades to areas around the light rail stations.
I’m concerned about the funding mechanism and disappointed that Metro didn’t allow for a more diverse way of funding the projects. However, the opportunity for matching Federal funding should not go overlooked.

What is your take on calls for racial justice and policing reforms across the United States, including in Tigard? 

I understand and acknowledge that our Black community is treated differently and have been a strong supporter of our efforts to work through discussing policy changes with our Police Department and evaluating City services. Racism exists in Tigard. It was clear to me when this discussion evolved and we received a significant amount of feedback from numerous community members that don’t believe racism exists anymore. I certainly don’t expect to have experienced it myself as a white female, however I’ve heard stories from our community members and I believe them. I appreciate the thoughtful conversations we are having on a City level how we can address these issues with policies and leadership. I support our Police Department and stand behind our levy passed in May, however I also acknowledge that we should look at our policies to ensure we are serving all of our residents in the best way possible.

How would you go about addressing inadequacies in Tigard’s city facilities, including City Hall and the police station? 

Our City facilities are in poor condition, especially our Police Department. The Police Department roof leaks and can no longer be repaired. We are also out of locker space for our female officers and unable to provide them adequate space to work, among other issues.
The City has started looking into options for new facilities to address the needs of all the departments including adequate space for our Police Department. The best option currently is an all-in-one facility where the current Public Works department is located off Burnham Street. This new facility could also include a parking structure which would serve the downtown area as well as the new Universal Plaza.
Funding for this project could potentially be achieved through a continuation of the Library Bond when it expires. This would be a great opportunity and would mean no new taxes for Tigard residents.

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